Save the Date! 4th Annual Sámi Film Festival

Suvi West by Katriina Haikala

Saturday, October 30, 2021 — 11am is expected to 3pm PST

Eatnameamet – Our Silent Struggle (2021) by Sámi filmmaker Suvi West will be among the offerings at this year’s Sámi Film Festival at the National Nordic Museum. (Read an excellent interview with West here.)

As it did last year, the museum will collaborate with the Scandinavia House in New York to present the festival virtually.

While I truly miss the experience of watching films together with friends, virtual festivals are Covid safe and convenient for working people.

Other films to be screened include Giitu giitu/Thank You Lord, a visual short film about “the Laestadian trance” by filmmaker Elle Sofe Sara. I’m intrigued, being familiar with liikutuksia (“movement”), the repentance ritual still practiced in the Old Apostolic Lutherans and other Laestadians.

Suodji/Shelter is a darkly comic film by Marja Helander (whose lovely Birds in The Earth is currently looping in the Finnish Landscapes exhibit). During the 1918 Flu Pandemic in Utsjoki, the Helander’s relative Ovllá-Ivvár decided to fool Death and take his fate into his own hands — what if one tried to do that now?

The full program will be announced and tickets released at the end of September.

Sámi Mittens

northhouse.org/course-session/forest-pond-skolt-sami-mittens-online-course-12-11-2021

Laura Ricketts is a master crafter and teacher who has made a study of Sámi knitting patterns on her travels to Sápmi. I had the pleasure of taking one of her classes at the Nordic Museum’s annual knitting conference a few years ago. She generously agreed to give a talk for us Sámi diaspora a few days later, at the Swedish Club, bringing samples of mittens that were simply stunning.

Laura is returning to Seattle again this fall, and she also has a class at the Northhouse Folk School.

Her classes sell out quickly so don’t hesitate if you have an interest.

August in Sámerica

At 01:19, you can hear Sandra Ericksen Eira joiked by Hans Ole Eira, Sámi Grand Prix winner (introduced by singer and actor Mikkel Gaup)

The uptick in Covid cases in Washington state means most of us are back to donning masks indoors, avoiding crowds, and washing our hands extra long. Just when we were getting out and about! It doesn’t have to be this way. Please persuade your friends and relatives to consult their doctors about vaccines, not social media, and then boost their immunity (and yours) by thanking them and staying in touch. Community boosts immunity!

Our ancestors lost so many of their loved ones to smallpox, pertussis, cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, you name it. I made a list based on death records for my own family and it was hearbreaking. So many children! Let’s do all we can to protect our most vulnerable.

Some of the events are online only. Follow Seattle Sámi on Facebook for the most current info.

August Events

6 pm, Wednesday, August 4, 2021

Sámi Parliament Member Sandra Andersen Eira, Leif Erickson Lodge, Ballard

Sandra will help install the lodge’s Sámi flag, talk about her role in the Sámidiggi, work as a sea captain, and whatever else she would like to share. There will be time for Q&A (maybe we can persuade her to tell how her home town inspired the film Ofelaš/Pathfinder.) A relief to some of you, we will NOT be singing the anthem together (thanks, Covid). We will listen instead. But, there will be cake! Free. In person only. No need to register. Questions? Email JoAn Rudo at the Lodge.

6 pm, Friday, August 13, 2021

Sámi Dreams, Photo Exhibit Reception, Nordia House, Portland

The exhibit is excellent, and no doubt the talk by photographer Randall Hyman & curator Max Stevenson will be fascinating. Hyman has been around the world as a Nat Geo photog. That said, it’s unfortunate the only Sámi included are two dimensional. We can all help our Nordic institutions adhere to the principle of “nothing about us without us” by flexing our memberships. (Join up to speak up!) Free. Online (registration required) and in person.

2:30 pm, Tuesday, August 17, 2021

A Night of Poetry From Fulbright Poets to Romania, Burkina Faso, and Finland

Two friends active in the Sámerican community are among the Fulbright poets sharing their work. Both did their Fulbrights in Finland, and both are extraordinarily talented. Tim Frandy is also the father of a charming toddler, professor of folklore, and translator of Inari Sámi Folklore, the first polyvocal anthology of Sámi oral tradition ever published in English. Cheryl Fish is professor of English, an essayist (from whose work about Sámi artistic response to resource extraction I learned the term “elegiac ecojustice”) and poet whose recent book, The Sauna is Full of Maids, romps through Finnish sauna culture and friendship. Free. Online only (register at link).

Do you want to share an event? Feel free to contact me here.

Language revival (Happy Meänmaa Day!)

I heard a lot of Finnish growing up, in church and at gatherings, and whenever Grandma talked to her Finnish friends. I can still say Good Girl, Bad Boy, Poopy Pants, Milk, Bread, Oatmeal, Scarf, God’s Peace, Forgive Me, Thank You, and What? At least I thought they were Finnish words. Now I’m not so sure. Since Grandma’s people were from Övertorneaå, they are more likely Meänkieli, or Tornedalen Finnish. Some of her ancestors spoke North Sámi and there are many loan words between the languages. I suspect any person with roots in the Torne valley is similarly mixed, although it seems in Sweden one is expected to choose which ancestors to acknowledge. That’s another tragic effect of colonialism, pitting people against one another.

Meänkieli is now one of the five minority languages of Sweden, largely due to the efforts of Bengt Pohjanen, prolific author, translator, agitator, and Orthodox priest. In 2016, after corresponding by email for several years, I met Bengt and his gracious wife Monika at their home for a memorable dinner (those Tornedalen potatoes!). He gave me this wonderful Meanmäa flag, which now flies from our porch on July 15th.

If I had a hundred lifetimes, I would devote myself to learning all of my ancestral languages.

All of them are minority languages: meänkieli, julevsámigiella (Lule Sámi), davvisámigella (North Sámi), karjalaižet (Karelian), suominkieli (Finnish), and walon, or whatever French the Walloons spoke in the 18th century.

It probably bears little relationship to the French I studied in college, which is still rudimentary despite marrying a fluent speaker. I studied Italian for a few months before our honeymoon, and Swedish before my big ancestral tour, but little was retained. Most recently I took a North Sámi class, and it was more challenging than all the others combined. It will take a lot of effort and even more courage to reclaim it.

In a radio interview last year, I introduced myself in North Sámi, which I usually do when giving talks in our community. But on Sámi radio? What was I thinking? Please edit this, I begged immediately afterward. I’m going to look like an idiot. My interviewer (the very genial and professional Tobias Poggats) assured me all was fine, and I decided that my distress was, in fact, good stress. To speak the words my ancestors were punished for speaking is a triumph. They are cheering me on. Good stress. (I’ve pasted the transcript below).

Of the many good reasons to preserve languages, the individual benefits are usually emphasized (the continuity of language in minority communities has been linked, for example, to better health and fewer suicides). But there are universal benefits:

Just as ecosystems provide a wealth of services for humanity – some known, others unacknowledged or yet to be discovered – languages, too, are ripe with possibility. They contain an accumulated body of knowledge . . . geography, zoology, mathematics, navigation, astronomy, pharmacology, botany, meteorology and more. In the case of Cherokee, that language was born of thousands of years spent inhabiting the southern Appalachia Mountains. Cherokee words exist for every last berry, stem, frond, and toadstool in the region, and those names also convey what kind of properties that object might have – whether it’s edible, poisonous, or has some medicinal value. — David Harrison, When Languages Die



*****

Here is a rough translation of my interview.

Sami association in the USA is revitalizing Sámi culture
mu namma lea Julie Whitehorn ja mon lean davvi-minnesotas eret . . .  (my name is Julie Whitehorn and I am from Minnesota . . . )

That’s how Sámi cultural revitalization on the other side of the ocean can sound. The Sámi association Pacific Sámi Searvvi in the USA has about a hundred members and the head of the association Julie Whitehorn tells us who she is and that she’s learning Sámi through the internet:

. . . this is me trying to learn Sámi online via the computer. It's difficult because in Seattle we don't have any language resources, but we want to change that.

The association she leads wants to revitalize the Sámi culture for Sámi in America. 

Sámis have been traveling across borders for a long time. There are stories and pictures of Sámi who have crossed the Atlantic to America during recent centuries. Julie is a descendant of Sámi from Gällivare / Jokkmokk. When she was young she was a part of the Laestadian church in America, and she often heard about the place where Laestadius came from. As an adult she visited and wondered why her relatives left such a beautiful place.

There's a lot of healing that can happen. I have met so many people who discovered their roots as adults, who feel that they are taking back something that was stolen from them. Because it was stolen, from all of us. 

Julie Whitehorn says that some are still questioning their Sámi identity while other are wanting to live a Sámi life where they are. She says the association would like to have more contact with Sámi and create connections between Sámi in different countries.

. . . seamme mearra, eara gatti, and I apologize if that's not entirely correct, but I mean to say same sea, different shore.



Diaspora Meetup Today

The Sámi of America Facebook group has many active, thoughtful members. Niina Serene is a licensed therapist who offered, in the wake of posts about Canadian residential schools, to lead an online support group. It makes me so happy to see folks taking initiative and giving their time and skills.

What the world needs now is love, sweet love.

Join if you can!

Sámi Dreams

Photo by Randall Hyman of Ana Maria Eira and her reindeer

If you live in or near Portland, Oregon, don’t miss Randall Hyman’s “talking” photo exhibit called Sámi Dreams, September through November, 2021 at the Nordia House, 8800 SW Oleson Road.

This stunning collection of portraits and interviews includes audio by the portrait subjects. It’s as if they are in the same room with you. The photographer and curator Randall Hyman is an accomplished observer of the Arctic, with four decades covering natural history and travel topics for Smithsonian, National Geographic, Discover, American History, The Atlantic, Science, Wildlife Conservation, et al.

As a 2013 Fulbright Scholar in Norway and guest of the Norwegian Polar Institute, Hyman covered field science, resource development and climate change in the Arctic for a number of organizations and publications. In 2015, he was the distinguished Josephine Patterson Albright Fellow of the Alicia Patterson Foundation, expanding on his coverage of Arctic climate change. He continues to focus on Arctic topics and lecture on polar climate change across the United States and Europe.

The exhibit was most recently in Minneapolis. I hope our National Nordic Museum will consider hosting it next; it deserves a wide audience.

Save the Date!

I’m delighted to share the news that Sandra Andersen Eira of Russenes, Finnmark will be visiting the USA this summer.

Among her events will be a presentation on

Wednesday, August 4, 2021
Leif Erickson Lodge in Seattle
Time TBA. Probably 6:30 pm.

Sandra just concluded her term as representative of the Sámi parliament on the Norwegian side. She is a sea captain, fisherwoman, world traveler, mom, and subject of an upcoming documentary about women in fishing. Watch the trailer here.

Kudos to the Leif Erickson for welcoming Indigenous Norwegians!

Sámi Film Minifest

Sámi Film Mini Fest 2x4 blue (3)

A dream come true: the first Sámi film festival in Seattle. If you’re reading this, trust me, you do want to miss these films, some of which are enjoying their premiere, and others that have won awards on the festival circuit and are unlikely to be screened here again.

Of particular interest for history buffs is “Kaisa’s Enchanted Forest” with French, Skolt Sami, German, and English dialogue (all the films are subtitled in English). It’s a moving and skillfully woven tale of unlikely friendships and the plight of the Skolt Sámi.

The documentary “Me and My Little Sister”  follows two sisters, one straight, one gay, who go in search of acceptance in Finnish and Norwegian Sápmi as well as Canada, and discover the myriad ways people restrict and empower one another.

Another film offering insight into hidden Sámi identity is “Family Portrait,” which follows the filmmaker’s effort to reunite her family in Norway.

A variety of several short films will amuse, inform, and confound expectations. For fans of “Sámi Blood,” which won the Space Needle award at SIFF last year, don’t miss Amanda Kernell’s “I’ll Always Love you Kingan.”

Included in the day pass is a tour of the Sámi exhibits in the beautiful new museum. There will also be a panel discussion and happy hour, with food and drink available.

As the recently-elected president of the all-volunteer Pacific Sámi Searvi Board, I will be present with fellow boardmembers, enjoying the festival and recruiting new members. If you’re lucky you’ll walk away with one of these stickers for your laptop or car. See you there!

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